How to Overcome Flying Anxiety

More than a quarter of Americans report feeling some kind of anxiety related to air travel. This guide goes into detail about some of the common causes of flight-related anxiety and how people can overcome it.

LGBTQ Mental Health

Studies have shown that people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) suffer from higher levels of anxiety and depression than the general public. In fact, approximately 30 – 60 % of the LGBTQ population have anxiety and depression and, as a whole, the LGBTQ community faces disproportionately high rates of suicide, self-harm, substance abuse and addiction. While there are many things that can influence a person’s mental and emotional wellbeing, prejudice and discrimination add additional trauma to LGBTQ mental health concerns.

Can Using Medical Marijuana Increase Anxiety and Depression?

As of this writing, 30 states, Guam, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico all have approved the broad use of medical marijuana. Additionally, other states allow limited medical use and 8 states (and the District of Columbia) allow recreational use of the drug. Even though the use of pot and weed is becoming more acceptable, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) still considers marijuana to be a Schedule I substance, meaning it is likely to be abused and it completely lacks medical value. This classification also means there hasn’t been much research into the efficacy of the drug for medical conditions and, in particular, we lack long-term studies that would tell us whether it is safe and/or effective when used over a long period of time.

For My Anxiety or Depression: Should I Use Medication or Therapy? (Webinar)

Dr. Andrew Rosen, Board Certified Psychologist, founder and director of the Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders and Dr. David Gross, Board Certified Psychiatrist, and medical director of the Center recently held a webinar on using medication versus therapy for anxiety and depression with The Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Some of the topics covered in the webinar include: What are the roles of medication and therapy? How can my psychiatrist (or primary care doctor) and my therapist work together as a team? How soon can I expect to see results from medication? How soon can I expect to see results from cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)? Are there situations where medication and CBT can work great together?